INTERVIEW
Spring 2016

Interview with Tracy K. Smith
by NEGESTI KAUDO

I think that finding a sense of community–of writers whom you trust and respect, and whose work you feel a strong commitment to–is crucial. That can be sustaining in the long path to publication and beyond. But I also feel very strongly that publication is something that shouldn’t be rushed.


FICTION
Spring 2016

Trader Joe’s And Free TC
by KENTA MANIWA

One aisle over, a Trader Joe’s employee, a middle aged woman with short hair and braces, started making dramatic facial expressions and pointing towards an old white lady. I removed my headphones.


INTERVIEW
Spring 2016

Montreal, for me, was so much about that supreme type of youth when you’re out there in the world by yourself for the first time and you’re coming to understand that there is so much stuff you just don’t know and that also, maybe even, most of what you think you know is irrelevant and/or completely wrong.


FICTION
Spring 2016

Nobody Coming
by SARAH BURGOYNE

Don’t let me be lonely, she said to her memory. After all, I am nobody coming.


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POETRY
Spring 2016

Tidal
by JESSIE KNOLES

i need to go to that little spot
no, not that spot but the other little spot


FICTION
Spring 2016

Turnip
by AMY FELTMAN

Willa knew that she took up too much space in the world. Not only with her body—she saw bodies all the time that were more expansive, that required special clothing options, sizes involving X’s. But her feelings spilled outwards, puddling like oil underneath a car. “It’s like you’re emotionally immune deficient,” she’d been told. “When I’m around you, everything hurts a little bit extra.”


POETRY
Spring 2016

Two Poems
by ADEBE DERANGO

if you fall between ocean & land, white & black
you may not get the best of both worlds



FICTION
Spring 2016

You Can’t Come Back from Lunch Expecting Everything to be the Same
by EMORY HARKINS

“I’m scared,” he says, and it seems more on accident than purpose. I feel closer to him for a moment and I like this. I ask him how he likes being home. Then he says, “Forget it, I feel fine.”


FICTION
Spring 2016

St. Francis
by REBECCA PAYNE

Their apartment is above the butcher shop they used to run, which now sits empty and decrepit. The windows aren’t papered over though; you can still see the dusty counter where I like to imagine him slicing meat in a white coat.

 


POETRY
Spring 2016

Two Poems
by BRYNNE REBELE-HENRY

Body-parted, we make diagrams of places not to touch

I don’t like saliva until it’s in her mouth, flashy liquid



POETRY
Spring 2016

Creatures
by MARCUS SLEASE

They scrub you clean in the bathhouse sez Mina. All that dead skin sez Jean. It just flakes away. The finest moment in the bathhouse sez Mina is right before plunging into the water. Three white seagulls cross each other in the glowing white sky


FICTION
Spring 2016

A Feeling for People
by BRENNA YORK

A recently-divorced 70-something took 20 minutes of my 23rd year.

First, he called me an idiot savant with regards to my schoolwork. Then his eyes met my ears:

“If the villains are yourself then people become real contenders.”


POETRY
Spring 2016

Two Poems
by RAE PARIS

Miss Annie, daughter of an ex-slave, needed someone to watch the White girl, so she told my grandmother, who got my mother ready.


INTERVIEW
Spring 2016

Interview with Kate Litterer

The last lucid dream I had was where an invisible ghost was trying to pull my lover and cats away from me, and in my dream I stopped and looked at where it would be and said “It’s okay. I don’t need you to protect me like that!” and then I woke up.